The average American worker will have 5.6 days to do the same job they were doing while working in a traditional office by 2020, according to recent findings from Indeed Prime Inc., a recruiting software and services company based in New York City. Workers would be willing to give up almost anything – like their commute, luxuries at home or seeing friends on weekends – just so they can keep earning money remotely without having as much face-to-face interaction with co-workers every day.

The “employees leaving for remote work” is a shocking thing to many people. Employees are willing to give up things like food, sleep and even their personal relationships in order to keep working remotely.

When it first began in earnest in March 2020, remote work was unheard of.

The first two weeks were stressful and unnerving for both management and staff due to Zoom issues. However, working from home quickly became popular.

Workers’ income and mental health also improved as a result of the increased productivity, which gave them more time to pursue new interests or rediscover old ones.

Now that life has returned to normal, many businesses want their staff members to return to their office desks and leave their kitchen tables (or sofas) behind.

However, according to Bloomberg, people are leaving their jobs rather than giving up remote work because they aren’t quite ready to give up their new favorite perk.

The CEO of Grenier Media, Tony Grenier, discovered this the hard way:

“Last month, I wrote a note to all of my staff members informing them that we would begin conducting comprehensive work at the office in July. But numerous staff have already sent me letters of resignation. As a result, our business is now experiencing a staffing shortage.

How much do workers appreciate working remotely?

Would they rather have the finest employee perks, such as health insurance and a 401(k), or the option to work remotely, if they had to make a decision? Would they accept a wage reduction to keep working remotely? Do they intend to give up their PTO?

To discover out, Breeze polled 1,000 Americans.

 

The outcomes

We surveyed 1,000 working-age Americans to find out what they would forgo if their company gave them the chance to work remotely full-time. These individuals are either employed or searching for employment at a position that can be fulfilled wholly from a distance.

Here is their response:

  • 65 percent would accept a wage decrease of 5%.
  • 38 percent would accept a wage decrease of 10 percent.
  • 24 percent would accept a wage decrease of 15 percent.
  • 18 percent would accept a wage decrease of 20 percent.
  • 15 percent would accept a wage decrease of 25 percent.
  • 39% would forego receiving advantages from health insurance.
  • 50% would forego their eyesight insurance benefits
  • 44 % would forego receiving dental insurance benefits.
  • 45 % would forego receiving disability insurance benefits.
  • 44 % would forego receiving life insurance benefits.
  • 46% would forfeit 25% of their paid vacation time (PTO)
  • 23 percent would forfeit half of their vacation time
  • 17 percent would forfeit 75% of their vacation time
  • 15% would forfeit all of their vacation time.
  • 36 % of respondents said they would renounce their 401(k) or other retirement plan.
  • 53 % would put in an additional 10 hours a week of work.
  • 48 % would forego receiving their student loan repayment aid.
  • 44% would forego paid parental leave.
  • 47% would forego receiving benefits for mental health.
  • 64 percent would forego the health advantages.
  • For the next year, 55% plan to stop using social media.
  • 34% would give up their right to vote in all future local & national elections for life
  • 52 percent said they would stop using Netflix or their preferred streaming provider in the next year.
  • 52 percent said they would stop using Amazon for a year.

Please contact me at [email protected] if you’d like to view the raw data or data that is split down by state, gender, race, age, etc.

 

The outcomes by generation

Every generation follows its own path, whether they are boomers, millennials, or members of Generation X.

Which generation was more willing to give up some of the finest employment perks in order to continue working remotely full-time?

What remote employment means to various generations is as follows:

 

Breeze remote work

Surprisingly, Gen Xers were often the group that was most willing to forego wage raises, give up some of the finest employment perks, or eliminate paid time off in order to work remotely full-time.

For instance, compared to 14 percent of millennials, 10 percent of zoomers, and 7 percent of boomers, 21 percent of Gen Xers would accept a 25 percent income loss. These relative percentages were 19 percent, 14 percent, 11 percent, and 6 percent when the sacrifice was 100 percent PTO. The numbers were 55%, 52%, 49%, and 48% when it said it would give up Amazon for a year.

How could this be? Since Gen Xers are in the peak parenting years of 41 to 56, remote employment allows them more freedom to balance working and raising a family at the same time.

When the epidemic started, Scott Penick, a 41-year-old father of four and full-time attorney, relocated from New Jersey to South Carolina. Although he accepted a wage decrease of almost $50,000, he values the freedom of working from home:

“Along with my wife and four kids, at 41 years old I moved back into the house I grew up in, where my mom still lives. It can be really humbling at times, but the flexibility and time with family are priceless. Before we buy our own home, we hope to travel and rent AirBnBs for extended periods of time around the country. I can do that, because I am 100% remote.”

It was not unexpected to see that baby boomers were the group least willing to forego advantages and privileges in favor of remote employment. Due to their extensive experience with the face-to-face office culture, baby boomers may have had a harder difficulty transitioning to the virtual aspect of work-from-home.

Other, more explicable occurrences follow. Because they are older and more susceptible to medical problems, baby boomers, for instance, were the group least likely to discontinue their health insurance coverage. They were the least inclined to forego PTO or put in an extra 10 hours a week because, at this point in their careers, why would they?

Finding millennials and zoomers often in the midst of Generation X and baby boomers was fascinating. These younger, more technologically aware generations would have been expected to continue doing work from home and avoid going back to the office at all costs.

However, they were less likely to quit their jobs than Gen Xers, which may be related to their efforts to increase their net worth, pay off their college loans, and save money for major purchases like a house. The least likely generation to give up benefits for mental health was the Zoomers, while the least likely group to give up benefits for life insurance was the Millennials.

Even while it wasn’t startling to see that Generation Z was the generation least likely to give up social media or Netflix for a year, it was stunning to learn that they were the generation most likely to give up voting for the rest of their life.

 

Moving forward

A significant movement toward remote work was sparked by the coronavirus outbreak. How will employers and workers proceed?

The results of our poll show that employees put a very high value on remote work, and are willing to give up income, PTO, health insurance coverage, or social media.

It is obvious that firms will need to adopt some kind of remote work in order to both retain existing workers and draw in the finest recruits.

When his employer asked staff to return to the office through email, John Simmons, a C-level executive of InboxAlly, became aware of this:

When we sent out an email requesting our team to come back to the office, we realized that roughly half of them would have a problem with it. One even expressed a desire to leave and volunteered to continue working as a freelancer. In a timely manner, we established an anonymous poll asking our staff members how to approach this problem. We discovered that individuals really want the flexibility to choose their working hours and location. As a result, as a compromise, we now have one mandatory office day each week that is mostly used for meetings. People have the option of working from home or going to the workplace four days a week. Everyone enthusiastically embraced this little modification.

In the future, the majority of businesses will probably opt for a hybrid solution like the one suggested by InboxAlly. In this approach, office culture’s team-building and face-to-face contacts may continue, but employees can still maintain some flexibility and a work-life balance by working from home when they want to.

Employers shouldn’t, however, demand that workers give up their pay, the finest employment perks, or paid time off in exchange for remote work.

Community Manager at MyPerfectResume Jessica Ulloa provided the following insight on that:

“It’s erroneously believed that working from home resembles taking a holiday, but this is not. I continue to be an employee that puts in a full day’s work and produces excellent outcomes. I don’t think it would be fair to take a salary reduction, give up PTO, or lose any other perk since just because I have more freedom to complete my job doesn’t imply I put in less effort. Remote employment should be seen as a reality, not a luxury or reward, when it comes to the workplace of the future.

 

advantages from workplace disability insurance

When asked whether they would forgo full-time remote work in exchange for disability insurance coverage from their present or next potential employer, 56 percent of respondents responded no, while 45 percent would.

It was a little interesting to learn that the majority of working Americans would not give up their disability insurance in exchange for working from home because it is not exactly the most prevalent job perk.

Group disability insurance can help workers make up part of the lost income when they are unable to work due to a sickness or accident for a monthly payment (most of which is normally covered by the employer). If the stats are any indication, group disability insurance is a very well-liked employee perk.

Disability insurance serves as a dependable safety net for workers who become ill or injured and are unable to produce an income. And for those who work for themselves, there is individual-purchaseable self-employed disability insurance.

An individual disability insurance policy is a wise investment to have, regardless of your work or coverage position. Benefits are often capped in group disability insurance policies, so the payment may not be enough for some. You may utilize an individual insurance to augment group coverage provided by your company or to fill the gap if they don’t provide any at all.

The policy is portable, so you may carry it from job to job, unlike group coverage, which you lose if you quit the company that gives it. Additionally, any individual disability insurance payments you get will be tax-free (group benefits are taxed). Consider it as a kind of income protection for yourself.

 

Methodology

Every piece of information in this report comes from a poll that Breeze hired Pollfish to perform online. One thousand adult Americans were polled in total. Each respondent had to be either working or actively seeking employment in a position that can be carried out totally remotely in order to be eligible for the study. In addition to a screener question, Pollfish’s age filtering function helped identify the right responses. Beginning on July 20th, 2021, and finishing on July 21st, 2021, this poll was carried out over a two-day period. All responders were requested to provide honest, best-effort responses to every question.

 

total survey outcomes

Notes: Due to rounding, some solutions won’t sum up to 100 percent precisely.

Please send me an email at [email protected] if you’d like to view the raw data or data that has been split down by state, gender, race, age, etc.

1. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work entirely remotely, would you accept a 5% salary cut?

  • “Yes” was the response from 65%.
  • “No” was the response from 35%.

2. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you accept a 10% salary cut?

  • “Yes” was the response from 38%.
  • No was the response from 62%.

3. If your next or present company offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you accept a 15% salary cut?

  • “Yes” was the response from 24%.
  • “No” was the response from 76%.

4. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you accept a 20 percent wage cut?

  • “Yes” was the response from 18%.
  • “No” was the response from 82%.

5. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you accept a 25% wage cut?

  • Only 15% said “yes.”
  • “No” was the response from 85%.

6. If your future or present employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you forego the health insurance benefits?

  • “Yes” was the response from 39%.
  • No was the response from 61%.

7. If your present or future employers offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you forego the advantages of vision insurance?

  • “Yes” was the response from 50%.
  • “No” was the response from 50%.

8. If your present or future employers offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you forego the advantages of dental insurance?

  • “Yes” was the response from 44%.
  • No was the response from 56%.

9. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you forgo your disability insurance benefits?

  • “Yes” was the response from 45%.
  • No was the response from 56%.

10. If your present or future company offered you the chance to work entirely from home, would you forego the advantages of life insurance?

  • “Yes” was the response from 44%.
  • No was the response from 56%.

11. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you be willing to give up 25% of your paid time off (PTO)?

  • “Yes” was the response from 46%.
  • “No” was the response from 54%.

12. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you be willing to forfeit 50% of your paid time off (PTO)?

  • “Yes” was the response from 23%.
  • 77% of respondents said “no.”

13. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you be willing to forfeit 75% of your paid time off (PTO)?

  • “Yes” was the response from 17%.
  • “No” was the response from 83%.

14. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you be willing to forfeit all of your paid time off (PTO)?

  • Only 15% said “yes.”
  • “No” was the response from 85%.

15. If your present or future employers offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you give up your 401(k) (or other retirement plan)?

  • “Yes” was the response from 36%.
  • “No” was the response from 64%.

16. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you put in an additional 10 hours a week?

  • “Yes” was the response from 53%.
  • “No” was the response from 47%.

17. If your present or future employer provided you the choice to work remotely full-time, would you forego the advantage of student debt repayment assistance?

  • “Yes” was the response from 48%.
  • “No” was the response from 52%.

18. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you forgo paid parental leave?

  • “Yes” was the response from 44%.
  • No was the response from 56%.

19. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work full-time remotely, would you forego the mental health benefits?

  • “Yes” was the response from 47%.
  • “No” was the response from 53%.

20. If your present or future company offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you forego the fitness benefits?

  • “Yes” was the response from 64%.
  • “No” was the response from 36%.

Would you give up social media for the next year if it meant that your present or future employer would allow you to work remotely full-time?

  • “Yes” was the response from 55%.
  • “No” was the response from 45%.

22. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you give up your right to vote in all local and national elections going forward for the rest of your life?

  • “Yes” was the response from 34%.
  • “No” was the response from 66%.

23. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you give up Netflix (or your preferred streaming service) for the next year?

  • “Yes” was the response from 52%.
  • “No” was the response from 48%.

24. If your present or future employer offered you the chance to work remotely full-time, would you give up your position with Amazon for a year?

  • “Yes” was the response from 52%.
  • “No” was the response from 48%.

MediaFeed.org syndicated this item after it first published on MeetBreeze.com.

 

More from MediaFeed: The 25 most rewarding self-employment options

The “working from home statistics 2021 covid” is a statistic that shows how often workers would give up their salary, health insurance, and other benefits to keep working remotely.

  • employees want to continue working from home
  • employees are quitting instead of giving up working from home
  • work from home
  • remote work statistics 2021 gartner
  • remote work statistics before and after covid
You May Also Like

The most tax friendly states in America

In the United States, taxes vary from state to state. If you’re…

Dreaming of sailing on your own boat? Here’s what it’ll cost you

Buying a boat can be expensive, with some models costing over $100,000.…

32 money-saving resolutions for 2022

The New Year is a time for making resolutions and setting new…

How To Become A Transcriptionist: Monetise Your Listening Skills!

Sure, you could try to become a full time transcriptionist to earn…